Liability Limitation for Indiana’s Weekend Warriors

On February 16, 2017, the Indiana Supreme Court issued an opinion regarding a sports participant’s duty owed to other participants in sports-injury tort cases. Megenity v. Dunn (No. 22D03-1309-CT-1354, decided Feb. 16, 2017). The Court affirmed the trial court’s ruling that a participant does not breach a duty owed to another participant by engaging in conduct ordinary in the sport, unless the participant intentionally or recklessly did so.

In Megenity, the plaintiff was a black belt in karate and attended classes at one particular studio for two years. At one session, she volunteered to hold a flying-kick bag while students practiced. The defendant was a green belt and accidentally executed a jump kick (both feet are off the ground) instead of a flying kick (one foot remains on the ground), which sent the plaintiff “flying and crashing to the floor”. The plaintiff suffered a knee injury, requiring surgery and months of physical therapy.

The plaintiff sued, arguing that the defendant breached a duty to her because a jump kick is never done during a flying kick drill. The trial court granted summary judgment for the defendant, finding a jump kick was an ordinary behavior during a kick-the-bag drill. The Supreme Court agreed, finding that “ordinary conduct” should be determined looking at the sport generally, not in the specific activity within the sport. As jump kicks are ordinary in the general sport of karate and the defendant did not intentionally or recklessly execute a jump kick, the defendant did not breach a duty even though the jump kick was contrary to protocol.

 

Erin Borissov is a former weekend warrior (volleyball, basketball, soccer, and softball) and a partner in the law firm of Parr Richey Frandsen Patterson Kruse with offices in Indianapolis and Lebanon, Indiana. She advises utilities and business clients in the areas of utility regulatory law, electric cooperative law, easement and right-of-way law, commercial transactions, corporate governance, and corporate compliance. 

The statements contained herein are matters of opinion and general information only and are not to be considered legal advice and should not be construed to form an attorney-client relationship. If you have any questions regarding this article, please contact an attorney.